April 27, 2016

Really Interesting


 

It’s really interesting.  Fascinating, actually.  It doesn’t take long for them to get the buildings ready.  In our complex, they are doing two long buildings and a short building each day.  Rows of trucks pull up on the inside street, and a large power lift is loaded with bundles of tarp. 

While this is happening, a man is working along the side of the building behind the plants clearing a space so the tarp can be sealed against the ground.  Rolls of heavy weights are placed on the sidewalks, and there’s a warning sign placed on every doorway.  Small pieces of carpte are attached at the corners so the tarps won’t rip.

The men up on the roofs load the tarps over their backs.  They are called mules.  Piercing whistles signal their actions as well as a yell or two.  Today the wind was blowing enough to make these colorful tarps act like sails.  The men on the ground as well as the mules on the roofs had quite a struggle.  I was able to capture some of the movement, but not the yells or whistles.

  • Himself:  He carried the last of the boxes down, and we left by five thirty.  Moved in to our motel room, discovered we lacked and item or two, and used one of our dinner coupons for dinner before going back to the house.  He spent the rest of the evening struggling to get his work computer to accept the wireless.  The other two computers work fine.
  • Herself:  Tried to stay out of his way.  Had a lettuce wrap cheeseburger for dinner.  Carried light boxes in.
  • Reading:  I brought 5 Mrs. Polifax books with me to read.

  • Gratitudes:  That we made it ok.  He’s off to buy a wireless adaptor this morning at nine.

  • 11 comments:

    1. You are right; that really looks interesting.

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    2. Fascinating to watch, I'm sure. It is a refined process, depending on the wind!

      Hope it is not too much of a discomfort for you both. Take care.

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    3. I saw this done in Hawaii. Termites there could cary you off. Hope all goes well while you are on the trail.

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    4. I did hear of a case in Hawaii where burglars tried to rob a house being tented since no one was at home. Instead, they were poisoned. Dianne is right. The termites here could carry you off.

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    5. A great industry. I'll bet it costs the building owners are pretty chunk of money. It also looks dangerous. I remember sitting in houses in college in Hawaii where the termites committed suicide in our outdoor fires.

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    6. We had our house tented when we sold it back in 2007. It is a truly fascinating event and I captured all of it on photo, but sadly, they're in my external hard drive and Windows 10 won't recognize it. Grrrr.

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    7. I'm seeing pop-up ads when I come to your blog, but am not sure if it's something on my computer or just Wordpress...

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    8. I went into a house once after it was tented and the tear gas they use in the mix had not "left." Holy shit.

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    9. Referred to your blog by Dkzoy because having termite situation here as well ... though our termites aren't big enough to carry a human away. LOL. Will be interested in hearing the aftermath, like how long you have to stay away and conditions inside when you return ... what do you have to have cleaned, thrown away. Thanks!

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